July 2010


I’ve started several posts on this certain subject, but have never published any of them.  (Last night I went through a bunch of drafts that WordPress saved automatically, and I saw all the posts I began on various topics and never finished.)  I didn’t quite know which angle by which to approach the subject, and each post sort of took a different look at it.  After reading this article by Fr. Euteneuer, though, I realized that I should probably just post it.

And, just so you know, Father isn’t some schmuck, nor is he prone to over-reacting.  He is a holy priest who has a keen sense of our culture and an even greater knowledge of evil– being an exorcist himself, he has looked evil in the face several times, I’d imagine.  So he isn’t messing around when he makes predictions as he does in the following article.

Please read it with an open mind!

Vampire Logic

Father Thomas Euteneuer

With the issuing of the third movie in the Twilight series, I have to speak out about our culture’s twisted fascination with vampires.  I don’t hesitate to tell people that I am totally disgusted with the new fad sweeping over our youth culture these days.  It is not just kids that are taken up with the wiles of the dark world either: many moms of teens are swooning for them too.  I think that these seductive creatures are simply the spawn of the Harry Potter culture that has for over a decade now been indoctrinating kids to think that the occult world is normal and that all this evil messaging is harmless when dressed up as entertainment.  That’s vampire logic – and just what the devil wants us to think.

Gone are the days of Bella Lugosi’s Dracula (1931) where good was good and evil was evil.  A crucifix would drive Dracula away, and then he had to go into his infernal coffin when the first streaks of dawn appeared.  He was in every way presented as a creature of evil, dark of heart and dread to encounter.  He drank human blood too, a feature that was supposed to strike terror in every person who valued his life’s essence.  The image of a blood-sucking creature who lives in slime and darkness and will pounce on you to drain out your very essence should terrorize every decent person.  This is because vampires used to be images of demons.  That’s what demons are all about: the vanquishing of all human decency and life.  They represent the spiritual vortexes of the demon world that drag down to the depths of hell all who fall prey to their wiles.

But, my, how vampires have come up in the world these days.

Nowadays vampires are divided into good and bad – no longer intrinsically evil.  The good ones rescue vulnerable women instead of biting them and, allegedly, drink only animal blood (well, we haven’t seen the last Twilight movie yet…).  And crucifixes?  Don’t think you’ll see any of those driving away bad guys in these movies.  The heroes are the “good” vampires, not the Church or religious faith in Christ.

These super-star vampires also walk around in sunlight and, as a matter of fact, their skin just happens to glisten like diamonds when exposed to direct sunlight.  Isn’t that wonderful?  The glam vamps are gentlemen, chaste and well-intentioned, yet they are always hovering around the edge of “falling” and in seductive situations which cause young people to think that they are capable, like their hero vampire, Edward Cullen, of going just so far and pulling back, out of self-control.  That’s teaching them to play with fire, not a real chastity message for kids.

The worst part of this fascination with vampires from a faith point of view, however, is its blasphemy of the Eucharist.  “Unless you eat my flesh and drink my blood you have no life in you,” said our Blessed Lord in Chapter 6 of John’s Gospel.  He is the One who offers His flesh and blood for the life of the world.  The vampires eat (bite) the flesh and drink the blood of victims rather than give their own to redeem others.  Their bites corrupt and transform their victims into vampires like themselves.  They have no life in them.  They are the “living dead” by their own estimate.

How sad that this generation has been so taken in by those who represent the very antithesis of the core reality of our Faith – the Eucharist.  Vampire logic is anti-Eucharistic logic, and it’s very dangerous for our kids.  In their obsessive fascination with such darkness, kids (and adults) turn their backs on the One who actually died for them.

To those who say, “Oh, Father, it’s only harmless entertainment,” I say simply: You’ve been warned.

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I was catching up with a friend the other day, and she was telling me about counseling a coworker who was pregnant and being urged to get an abortion.  My friend was the only one in this girl’s life who was telling her to keep her child.  Over lunch, they discussed the girl’s options.

She told my friend she couldn’t find a single reason to have the baby, seeming to challenge my friend to tell her why she shouldn’t have the abortion.

Not that long ago, the burden of proof would have been with her. Why should my friend have to prove that she should give life to her child?  What the heck has happened with our world, that the burden of proof lies with the person advocating for the baby’s life?!

As my friend talked to her about allowing her baby to live, she brought up the option of adoption.  If the girl didn’t feel that she could raise the child, and if she felt the child would be a burden, why not give the baby up for adoption?

“Oh, I couldn’t do that,” the girl replied.  “I couldn’t carry the baby for 9 months and then just give it away.”

The next week, she aborted the baby, despite my friend’s attempts to change her mind and all the information she gave her to direct her to pregnancy centers where she could find free help.

Yes, adoption would have been hard– an enormous sacrifice.  I propose that it is the hidden sacrificial act of our day.

So many of our young girls find themselves in these difficult situations.  Perhaps there was one night, one choice, when she made a selfish decision.  A selfish act that thought only of herself, her desires, and her passions.  She gave herself to another, perhaps to someone she barely knows.

She now has the opportunity to perform an entirely selfless act.  She has the opportunity to give a part of herself to another, to a married couple she barely even knows.  After carrying a baby for nine months and giving her life to the baby — who takes, takes, takes from her– she then “just gives it away.”  She gives him away to a couple who is waiting expectantly for a baby to call their own.  She gives life to the couple as she gives life to her child.

Perhaps my friend’s coworker felt to give her baby up for adoption would be admitting she wasn’t capable of caring for her child.  Or perhaps she knew it would be hard to behold the child’s bright eyes and little fingers and then never see him again.  So instead she made another selfish choice.

To “just give it away,” might seem callous, cowardly, or unloving.  But it’s often the loving action.  The selfless decision. The heroic act.

It’s incredible how many GRE words are descriptive of the present administration.  Obama is my mnemonic for a lot of words as I study.

And every day, he proves himself a “worthy” mnemonic for dissemble, mendacious, prevaricate, equivocate…

Obama Administration OKs First Tax-Funded Abortions Under Health Care Law

This doesn’t surprise most of us.  So much for an executive order, huh?  Okay, Catholic Health Association– what are you going to say now?  Or do you even care?

This morning on the news, they were making a big deal about the possible “postage hike.”

First, I found this article helpful in summarizing some issues that the USPS are facing — the fact that they are caught in the middle (they are a quasi-private business, quasi-government service), why they can’t function like UPS, and what would be different if they tried to be more like their UPS competitors.

Secondly, I’d like to defend the post office.  A few weeks ago, I mailed a letter to Austria for 98 cents.

Ladies and gentlemen, that’s incredible.  I paid less than a dollar to mail a letter to another country.  Across the Atlantic Ocean.  To some city in the mountains.

Can you buy anything for a dollar anymore?  We pay three or four dollars for a cup of water that’s been flavored with beans.  Over the course of this past weekend, my friends and I paid over $25 to park my car on a piece of asphalt.  We pay a lot for a lot.  And yet I paid 98 cents to put something in a box and have it arrive in another box over four thousand miles away, in only a week or so.  Seriously, that’s nuts.

It’s not as if the post office is asking to raise the price of stamps to a dollar.  Or even fifty cents.  So I pay 46 cents to mail something across the United States of America.  FORTY SIX CENTS.  That’s nothing.

So I’m not going to complain.  Nor am I going to stop writing letters.  Mail seems to be the only deal around here these days.